hetzelAs busy season comes to a close young CPAs are able to find more time to relax with their favorite hobbies and activities, but as young CPAs, we always look for places where we can grow in ourselves and career. Over the past year, I have been working to grow myself by reading more, which will help with my writing, comprehension, reading speed, and overall knowledge. In researching methods to increase my reading, I found a great article from the Harvard Business Review, “8 Ways to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year.” The article gives few tips on how to increase your reading, some I have already begun implementing including:   (more…)

barnesEvery year, after the New Year’s hangovers are healed and the holiday decorations stored safely away, a dark cloud begins to form over the head of all Americans. Dread and suspense build as we deliberately procrastinate while turning our attention to other tasks that have been long neglected in hopes that the problem will vanish. Tasks like reorganizing every photo on your computer by date and who is pictured, doing the dishes 3 times a night to be absolutely sure they are clean, and ironing your bedsheets so they are totally wrinkle free. Across the country, errands are endlessly run and houses are spotless. Until, the inevitable finally arrives. Like a train barreling down the track with the bridge blown out ahead, April 15, and the tax deadline, arrives. (more…)

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The Young CPA Committee of the Florida Institute of CPAs has a remedy for frazzled, desk-bound accounting professionals of all ages!

Join the movement to lend your able bodies for the statewide CPA Day of Service, to be held on Saturday, May 20, 2017. It’s an initiative that promotes the generosity of our profession by organizing our members, their associates, friends and families together to impact their local communities for this annual, one-day charitable event. (more…)

  1. Use every available opportunity to hone your technical skills.Your first years on the job are a time for learning as much as you can about how your chosen profession works, from its processes and procedures to how it does research to how it interacts with clients, and everything in between. Ask questions. Listen to the answers. Learn how to read between the lines. The added benefit of all of this is that you will begin to understand a lot about yourself. Things like what you like to do and what you don’t; what motivates you and what doesn’t. Ultimately, these are the tools you’ll use to shape your career.

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CarterHistorically, the accounting profession has been protected from massive labor changes. The profession has grown over the years through increased regulations, mergers and firms that provide niche services. However, changes are on the horizon. Artificial intelligence and automation will be major changes within the profession. (more…)

Jessi EngelhardGoing into your first busy season in public accounting can be quite intimidating.  If you’ve dubbed yourself an auditor, it’s likely that week one you’ll be interacting with the client.  Or if you’ve chosen tax, you’re given the forms and asked to go with it.  Everything in school seems challenging but then you get hit with the real world of public accounting.  If you haven’t realized it yet, you will soon…school gives you the vocabulary, the frame of reference, and the ability to confidently tell the difference between debits and credits, but it’s your first busy season where you learn how much you don’t know.  I recently came across an article in the Journal of Accountancy that included tips for first-year auditors.  Even though some of the tips seem obvious, sometimes, we have to remind ourselves. (more…)

The first time I tried to enlist in the Marine Corps, I got laughed out of the recruiter’s office. At a pudgy 300 pounds, I was hardly an ideal candidate. The recruiter was just playing the odds when he took one look at me, pointed to the door, and told me to stop wasting his time.

After months of diet and exercise, I did get a recruiter to take me seriously – and finally graduated from boot camp at 185 pounds, 18 months after that initial failed attempt. The tough feedback that I received in the Marines was exactly what I needed to get my life together.

Read the rest of the article from Harvard Business Review.